Now There’s An Actual Way To Have Moving Portraits Like In Harry Potter

Editor of The Vocal

Approx 3 minute reading time

This is not a drill peoples. We are one step closer to living in the Harry Potter universe. Only one billion more steps to go!

Creator of Moving Portraits, Jeremy Brull has finally kicked off the prototype to a magical idea he’s had in the making for the last few years. Using his top notch skills in film and direction, he’s all about capturing the moment using high quality video that can be framed and replayed over and over again. It’s just like the movie paintings from Harry Potter, except IRL!

The concept has finally and literally come to life thanks to the help of a remarkable young company in the United States called Canviz, who had the perfect technology to build the prototype.

It’s a way to cherish subjects and places the way we do the movies. It’s a way of capturing the essence of someone or somewhere far beyond the ability of a photograph. The power of a moving portrait, the thing that I believe will set it apart from anything else is that it combines the best of both photography and cinematography. The beauty of a photograph is that it can freeze a moment in time. The beauty of a film is that it can keep a moment alive, again and again. Whereas a photograph is still, a Moving Portrait is a living, breathing reminder of the subject.

Here’s the full story from Jeremy describing his dream and vision behind Moving Portraits and why it means so much to him.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve loved movies.

And while there’s nothing more exciting than watching a new movie unfold, I love the act of re-watching a film – rediscovering them over and over again. That’s the really beautiful thing about movies – while everything around them changes, films stay the same. You can revisit them again and again, like comfort food.

Of course, after a while you realise that your love of the film is made of specific moments that stand out. It could be a scene, it could be a line – hell, it could be just be a single closeup of someone’s face. A twinkle in their eyes, their lips forming a smile, a strand of hair falling across their face, falling in and out of light – anything.

One image that always stayed with me was in the film ‘Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban’ – Harry’s deceased parents dancing with each other inside the photo frame on his bedside table.

This is why I’ve created Moving Portraits. It’s a way to cherish subjects and places the way we do the movies. It’s a way of capturing the essence of someone or somewhere far beyond the ability of a photograph. The power of a moving portrait, the thing that I believe will set it apart from anything else is that it combines the best of both photography and cinematography. The beauty of a photograph is that it can freeze a moment in time. The beauty of a film is that it can keep a moment alive, again and again. Whereas a photograph is still, a Moving Portrait is a living, breathing reminder of the subject.

One of my favourite portraits was for my Dad. He wanted me to create a portrait of his dog Snowball, playing at the park near his flat. He was weeks away from moving overseas and he wanted a reminder of his life in Australia through his pet. So getting it right became very important to me – I wanted to give him a window into his old ‘backyard’ on the other side of the world.

You can decide for yourself whether I succeeded here.

But while my dad was happy with the portrait, it also made me realise that my portraits were missing one crucial element: the frame. A brilliant photo can be framed, but there was no such option for what I was doing; most digital frames were tacky and had terrible image quality – especially when you tried to play video files! I’d given up hope until I came across an intriguing Kickstarter video…

Now, almost one year later, I finally got my hands on the perfect frame – all through a remarkable young company in the United States called Canviz, which you can check out here.

But how close am I to making Harry Potter portraits a reality? See for yourself.

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Check out more of Jeremy's work here

  Poetry in motion